CDC: 40 % of US Cancer Linked To Excess Weight

Health, News

The CDC recently released the results of a new study that suggests we need to shed some unnecessary weight to help reduce the risk of cancer.

Cancers associated with being overweight or obese account for 40% of all diagnoses of the disease in the United States, an increasing share of all cancer diagnoses nationwide, reported The Guardian.

In a nation where 71 % of adults are either overweight or obese, the findings by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention “are a cause for concern,” said the agency’s director Brenda Fitzgerald.

“A majority of American adults weigh more than recommended -– and being overweight or obese puts people at higher risk for a number of cancers,” she said in a statement.

“By getting to and keeping a healthy weight, we all can play a role in cancer prevention.”

Consumption of animal protein has also been associated with a higher risk of cancer as well as many other diseases.

Carrying excess weight has been shown to boost the risk of 13 types of tumors, including cancers of the esophagus, thyroid, postmenopausal breast, gallbladder, stomach, liver, pancreas, kidney, ovaries, uterus, colon and rectum.

Colorectal cancer was the only weight-associated cancer that decreased from 2005-2014 — falling 23 %, due in large part to screening, said the report.

All other cancers linked to weight rose seven % in that decade.

About two-thirds of the 630,000 weight-associated cancers diagnosed in 2014 occurred in people aged 50 to 74.

Women were particularly susceptible, with 55 % of all cancers diagnosed in women associated with weight, compared to 24 % of those diagnosed in men.

According to the latest CDC data, 32.8 % of people in the United States are overweight, and 37.9 % are obese.

 

The CDC uses BMI to classify people as overweight or obese. You can calculate your BMI based on height and weight, it does not take muscle/fat ratio into consideration.

(Article By Jeremiah Jones)

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