Are Cops In Chicago Behind Many Of The Shootings That Are Blamed On Gang Violence?

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This year, during Memorial Day weekend, a number of huge mainstream media outlets reported that a whopping 56 people had been shot – with a dozen being killed – in the City of Chicago.

But in the South Side of the city, rumors have been circulating that many of these killings were not in fact carried out by members of the community, or “gang activity” as the police and Mayor Rahm Emmanuel claim. Instead, many people are saying that the police are the ones behind these shootings.

Part of what has caused this speculation is the fact that there were no arrests made in all of these holiday shootings. This is hardly the first time such a scenario has occurred.

The history of corruption among the Chicago Police Department has been widely documented over the years, and has come to a head during recent cover-ups of police executions.

The city of Chicago even recently had to pay out reparations to victims of police “torture.”

So many in the community have drawn their own conclusions about these recent waves of killings: no one in the community seems to know anything about who carried them out. That is somewhat unusual, as people talk – especially when taking credit for killing rival gang members, which is what the Chicago police and mayor have claimed about these killings.

With no suspects and arrests, it seems a bit unusual as well.

Only a few years back, Illinois State Rep. Monique Davis publicly reported that she too had been hearing talking within the community about police officers carrying out executions – sometimes of drug dealers who had come up short on the share of the money that dirty cops had demanded. Other times, they were rumored to have made deals with one dealer to take out rivals.

Do you think that it is possible what the community is saying is right? Could police officers be behind many of the shootings in Chicago in which there have been no arrests made or suspects pinpointed?

(Article by M. David and Shante Wooten)

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